Looking at raising money for a start-up or any new tech is, to put it mildly, hair-raising.  There are so many options such as bootstrapping, angel investors, VCs or begging friends and family.  There is also another way called crowdfunding, and this is how you can raise money in a fairly low risk way.  So, let’s explore how you can raise money for that new tech while you’re still in university. 

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Apps created for smartphones and tablets continue to make our lives easier and more interesting.  They let us share and connect with friends and family as well as those that we may not even know.  Now, they are helping university students and others connect over their half-eaten food.

It has always been common knowledge that the vast majority of college students do not have a lot of extra spending money to throw around.  Rather, they are known for rummaging for free food just about anywhere that they can find it.  Now, with LeftoverSwap they can meet with others who are in the same boat.  Sharing and trading leftovers may help them find food when they are low on funds as well as adding a little variety to their meals.

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According to investor Bitna Brown, the world misses out on all the promise that it may see if half of its population – women – is “under-utilized” in the tech startup sphere.  Women are major consumers and the absence of their leadership or input in the space of innovation means that many great ideas will never see the light of day.

Brown also emphasizes the need to target business that “utilizes technology to disrupt an ongoing problem that is scalable and has the capacity to generate massive revenue and employ thousands of people.”  This is why Brown is leveraging her resources, non-profit fundraising ability and mentorship experience to help launch female-owned startups.

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Modern startups must often go mobile.  They also benefit from seeking minimum viable products (MVP) that can get to market quickly and immediately create value for customers.  However, in the rush to get to market, it is very easy to ignore performance issues.

An application that works well in a test environment may grind to a halt if a user has been running it for a while.  In order to avoid user performance complaints down the road, a mobile startup should pay attention to the following topics.

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It is becoming well-known that crowdsourcing platforms are available to fulfill almost any business function.  This fact can be a massive benefit to cash-strapped startups that are not at the point where they can staff entire departments, or even for startups that opt to remain lean.  Of course, which business tasks should be crowdsourced depends on the business model and resources available.  It is not a good idea to assume that we should arbitrarily crowdsource everything.

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Software as a Service (SaaS) applications are reaching a level of full business saturation and maturity.  As a sign of how widespread SaaS has become, examine this breakdown of all of the leading apps in analytics, collaboration, CRM, demand generation, document management, finance, HR, and social enterprise.  Given that there are dozens of providers linked above, it is not a surprise that Gartner has predicted the SaaS market to reach $22.1 billion in 2015.  With this market veering toward a winner-take-all model as well as being set to explode, let us take a look at some of the keys to a successful SaaS app.

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It is no secret that the Linux community keeps a close watch on Microsoft.  Even though the once-mighty OS giant from Redmond isn’t the force that it used to be, many still like to keep an eye out for Microsoft not using its own tools and operating system for its business needs.  After all, Microsoft’s tool suites and platforms have overwhelmingly been geared toward the B2B market, and so they should be ideal for the company’s own needs, right?  However, as long as there have been Linux verses Windows feuding, stories such as this, pointing out that Microsoft used Akamai’s Linux-based site acceleration service, typically generate waves in the tech blogosphere.

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At the beginning of every startup is some kind of product or service idea.  For example, it may be inspired by a quirky observation made by a founder one day on the way to work.  It could also be created by an engineer who realizes a niche and decides to head out on their own in order to develop this new tool.  The new product or service may also be the product of a brainstorming session meant to create ideas for submission to an incubator like Y Combinator.  Wherever the idea comes from, it is at the heart of a startup and there is no way a nonviable idea is going to gain traction on the market.

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Incubator?  Why call it something with such infantile connotations?  Well, let us consider that some of the richest startup founders out there are not yet 30 years old, and that people like Paypal co-founder Peter Thiel are willing to bet millions on inventors who are not yet 20 years old.  From these facts it becomes apparent that youth seems to be a great commodity in the world of tech startups.  Also, it is perhaps beneficial to “nurture” startups in a way that is controlled and ensures that they will best reach their potential.  Let’s take a look at the benefits of incubators for startups/new tech:

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Creating a great site that draws visitors, makes sales and helps differentiate you from the competition can be difficult.  There are a lot of elements that go into creating a great SaaS (Software as a Service) site.  Here are 5 components that many great SaaS sites have in common.

Value Proposition is Visible

Make sure the value proposition is “above the fold” or in other words visible on the page without having to scroll down or search a secondary page.  This statement should tell visitors what your business does better than everyone else.  These statements are generally one sentence and again easily visible.

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